Review: Can’t Escape Love by Alyssa Cole

I’ve been looking forward to this book for a while. The first book in the series, A Princess in Theory, was probably my favorite new book of last year, and when I finished it, one of the first things I did was to tweet to the author, asking if Reggie would have a book of her own, and…

Dr. Phil and Interabled Romance

I’ve got a new review coming up soon (for a book that I’ve been looking forward to for a while), but until then, an article on the recent controversy over Dr. Phil. He said that “100 out of 100” relationships that involve caregiving will fail. A lot of couples prove him wrong.

Review: Sweet Disorder by Rose Lerner

When I started this blog, I wasn’t sure that I was going to review many Regency romances with injured war heroes. There are just so many of them, and most of them seem to fall into one of two categories: either a Beauty and the Beast trope (and, at some point, we really need to…

Review: Getting Schooled by Christina C. Jones

This is the second book that I’ve reviewed by Christina C. Jones.  In the first, Review: Relationship Goals by Christina C. Jones, the hero’s disability was much more of a central plot point, both in terms of the characters and the conflict of the story.  In Getting Schooled, the hero’s disability is much more incidental to the…

Review: A Girl Like Her by Talia Hibbert

It’s been a while since my last post — real-life stuff has been keeping me busy — but welcome back, anyone who’s still following! I’ve been wanting to review this book since it first came out. Good autistic representation is pretty hard to find in romance novels (or anywhere, really.) That seems to be slowly…

Review: Soul Deep by Pamela Clare

I’m back, after taking some time off to have some surgery on my hand, and I’m finally reviewing a book I’ve been meaning to write about for a while.  I can’t remember who first recommended it to me, but it’s quickly become one of my comfort reads. Soul Deep comes in the middle of a series,…

Phantom Waltz rant: How not to write disabled characters

I started this as a livetweet, and it expanded into this.  This book is Phantom Waltz by Catherine Anderson.  I went back and forth a bit about whether to directly criticize books that I felt were harmful, but I ultimately decided that I would do it in certain circumstances: if it was a book from an…

Review: Worth It All by Claudia Connor

I’m nearly certain that this book was at least partially inspired by the viral photo of Oscar Pistorius and a little girl with similar prosthetics, running on a track together.  The brilliant Stella Young wrote about the way this photo has been used as inspiration porn (and seriously, go read what she wrote about it), but Worth It…

Review: Take Your Medicine by Hannah Carmack

I struggled a bit with how to write this review without giving spoilers.  Most of what I want to talk about with it, and how it uses disability tropes, would spoil the ending.  If I thought that the tropes were used in a damaging way, then I wouldn’t worry so much about spoilers, but I…

Review: Slim to None by Freya Barker

Slim to None has disability representation that I don’t often see in romance novels: the heroine is somewhat older than usual (she’s 47); she has chronic pain (which, as I’ve mentioned, doesn’t show up too often in romance); she sometimes uses a walker (a sparkly purple one! I love my sparkly purple walker); and she’s got varying mobility,…