Review: Getting Schooled by Christina C. Jones

This is the second book that I’ve reviewed by Christina C. Jones.  In the first, Review: Relationship Goals by Christina C. Jones, the hero’s disability was much more of a central plot point, both in terms of the characters and the conflict of the story.  In Getting Schooled, the hero’s disability is much more incidental to the…

Review: A Girl Like Her by Talia Hibbert

It’s been a while since my last post — real-life stuff has been keeping me busy — but welcome back, anyone who’s still following! I’ve been wanting to review this book since it first came out. Good autistic representation is pretty hard to find in romance novels (or anywhere, really.) That seems to be slowly…

Review: Soul Deep by Pamela Clare

I’m back, after taking some time off to have some surgery on my hand, and I’m finally reviewing a book I’ve been meaning to write about for a while.  I can’t remember who first recommended it to me, but it’s quickly become one of my comfort reads. Soul Deep comes in the middle of a series,…

Phantom Waltz rant: How not to write disabled characters

I started this as a livetweet, and it expanded into this.  This book is Phantom Waltz by Catherine Anderson.  I went back and forth a bit about whether to directly criticize books that I felt were harmful, but I ultimately decided that I would do it in certain circumstances: if it was a book from an…

Review: Worth It All by Claudia Connor

I’m nearly certain that this book was at least partially inspired by the viral photo of Oscar Pistorius and a little girl with similar prosthetics, running on a track together.  The brilliant Stella Young wrote about the way this photo has been used as inspiration porn (and seriously, go read what she wrote about it), but Worth It…

Review: Take Your Medicine by Hannah Carmack

I struggled a bit with how to write this review without giving spoilers.  Most of what I want to talk about with it, and how it uses disability tropes, would spoil the ending.  If I thought that the tropes were used in a damaging way, then I wouldn’t worry so much about spoilers, but I…

Review: Slim to None by Freya Barker

Slim to None has disability representation that I don’t often see in romance novels: the heroine is somewhat older than usual (she’s 47); she has chronic pain (which, as I’ve mentioned, doesn’t show up too often in romance); she sometimes uses a walker (a sparkly purple one! I love my sparkly purple walker); and she’s got varying mobility,…

Review: Priceless by Linda Kage

While re-reading this book before writing this review, I kept thinking, “I see things I need to critique, but these characters are just being so adorable!”  And really, that’s what I’ve got for this book: I mostly loved it, it’s got a few problematic things that I do want to address, and the characters are…

Mini-reviews: Queerly Loving (Volume 2) and Resilience: Puerto Rico

These are a couple of short story collections that came out recently, both with some good disability rep. First, Queerly Loving (Volume 2).  It’s a collection of stories with characters from “across the fantastic queer spectrum,” all of them very sweet.  I really loved reading this book.  Disability rep that I noticed: “Tenderness” by Xan West…

Review: Ghost Dance by Catherine Gayle

Let me start this one with a couple of content notes: this book has a character (a veteran) who has PTSD, and there are some scenes with him that get very intense.  I would probably recommend skipping this one if anything about that might be triggering for you.  There are also a couple of scenes…